8 Best Social Stories for Dealing with Icky Feelings and Frustration

Best Social Stories - Child who doesn't want to give up tablet

Take a look at the below list for some of our favorite social stories for dealing with a wide range of icky emotions and how to interpret them for a child on the autism spectrum.


Best Social Stories – Whether it’s helping your child accept “no” as an answer or teaching them how to properly express frustrations and anger, there are many guides for parents, but not always good guides for children on how to process these types of situations and emotions.

Take a look at the below list for some of our favourite social stories for dealing with a wide range of icky emotions and how to interpret them for a child on the autism spectrum.

When I’m Frustrated (Free)

Behavior management: A social story mini-book on how to handle frustration with calming strategies. A great way to discuss feelings and appropriate ways to express them!

Accepting No As An Answer ($3)

This social story is part of my social story pack that is a bundled price.

Tantrums Don’ Help Me Fix a Problem (Free)

Tantrums Don’t Help Me Fix a Problem is a social story created by TAP. This particular social story is written to help children understand why tantrums will not fix their problem.

Blurting Out (Free)

Blurting Out is a FREE social story to help students learn to listen to others while they are speaking and why it is important to follow the classroom rules.

Sometimes I Can’t Do the Thing I Want (Free)

Sometimes I Feel Upset (Free)

Sometimes I Make Mistakes (Free)

Sometimes I Feel Angry

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