Top 4 Tips for Getting Your Child With Autism Into Their Fall Coat

Child zipping up a warm jacket

The change of seasons is just around the corner and with that comes the drop in temperature that brings on the dreaded extra layers of fall coats.


Getting Your Child With Autism Into Their Fall Coat

The change of seasons is just around the corner and with that comes the drop in temperature. That brings on the dreaded extra layers of fall coats, and you may need help with your child with autism.

While Florida is sometimes spared this for a little while – it inevitably comes – and if your child has issues with temperature regulation or doesn’t always want the extra bulk, this time can be especially daunting.

Here are a few tips to ease the transition:

1. Offer Multiple Choices:

Sometimes feeling like a child has a little bit of control can help ease the frustration of wearing something they might not be so excited about. Offer a few coat options and let them choose between the suggestions to give them a little independence.

2. Try Different Fabrics:

This may seem like an obvious choice, but if your child absolutely refuses to wear a wool coat, it could be the fabric at fault. Try cotton blends, fleece, jersey, silk, etc. until you come across something a bit more tolerable.

3. Buy Multiples:

When you find something that works, buy it a few sizes up as well. As your child grows, you will have their favourite coat available to them for years to come and really keep those daily frustrations down as you rush out the door.

4. Practice Makes Perfect:

Try to ease your child into layers in general by visiting indoor play spaces, cold movie theaters, taking a walk on a rainy day, or touring an aquarium where the temperatures are kept low, all throughout the Summer and heading directly into Fall so that your child has an opportunity to consistently wear a coat and some of the other accessories that go along with colder temperatures – close-toed shoes, socks, and scarves. Preparation will keep these items from being something to dread the shock of, to making it something that gets pulled out continuously when the time is right.

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